Global Green Building
Energy Conservation

 

There are varying degrees of energy conservation and initially you need to find the level that is the most comfortable for you and your lifestyle.  Living a greener life can become a habit at all levels of conservation. 

There are several question that you can ask yourself as a homeowner, check the ones that are important to you. 

  • What can I recycle and where can I dispose of my recycled items? 
  • How can I recycle my yard waste?
  • Can I recycle building materials when I remodel or build my home?      
  • What kind of light bulbs should I choose next? 
  • Where can I install the energy efficient light bulbs?
  • What is the difference between incandescent, fluorescent, low voltage lighting, and LED's?
  • Does my window placement make a difference in the available light in my house?
  • How can I get more daylight in my house?
  • Where should I use motion sensors for lighting in and around my house?
  • How can I get brighter lighting in my workspaces?
  • Do the different styles of light switches make a difference?
  • Where is the runoff from my gutters going? 
  • What if I don't have gutters on my house?
  • How much water runs off my roof and driveway?  
  • Is there a use for my old septic tank or cistern?
  • Is the runoff water polluted?
  • What can I do with the runoff water?  How can I store it?
  • What is the SEER rating of my air conditioner or heat pump? 
  • What is the coefficient of performance for my heating system?
  • Do programmable thermostats make a difference?
  • Should my appliances be Energy Star rated?
  • Are gas or electric appliances a better choice?
  • Are there vacation settings for my water heater and HVAC systems?
  • Which appliances cost me the most money to operate?
  • What time of the day is it best to use my appliances?
  • Do I need to replace my existing appliances?
  • Does the style of appliance I choose make a difference?
  • Should I wait to replace my appliances when they wear out?
  • Is my insulation in the attic sufficient?
  • Should I insulate my basement?
  • Should I insulate my garage?
  • Is it to late to insulate?
  • What are my insulation choices?
  • How do I insulate the water heater?  Is that safe?
  • Can I insulate my hot water pipes?
  • How should my home be ventilated?  What are my choices?
  • How can I stop the air flow in my leaky windows and doors?
  • Is my attic space ventilated correctly?
  • Should I install a whole house ventilation system?
  • How should I ventilate my HVAC system?
  • How should I ventilate my appliances?
  • Do the exhaust fans in my kitchen and bath waste energy?
  • Do I need to ventilate my basement or crawl space?
  • Can I over ventilate my house?
  • Is outside air important?
  • How will my ventilation choice affect my health?
  • Are there ventilation standards for homes?
  • How should I filter the ventilated air?
  • Should I filter my drinking water?
  • What kind of filters are available for my HVAC system?
  • Should I filter the natural light entering my home?
  • How can I filter noise pollution in my home?
  • Why are the return air vents for my HVAC necessary?
  • How do I get rid of Radon in my basement?
  • Do plants in my house make a difference in air quality?
  • How much water is wasted with my leaky faucet or hose?
  • How can my pet be affected by my energy conservation choices?
  • How do my doors and windows affect my ability to conserve energy?
  • How can I conserve energy and reduce the threat of mold and mildew?

 Many products can help the consumer save energy.  The true test of how great the  savings will be is an analysis of the life cycle cost.  Compare the cost of the product choices with the operating costs and the life span.  This will show you a comparison of costs and allow you to make an informed decision about what product is right for you.  Many home appliances already provide this information.  For example, Energy Star rated appliances have already met specific government guidelines for energy conservation.  Some green products have higher initial costs but save much more in the years of service and in the amount of time and money spent on installation. 

Everyone can conserve energy and save money by making a commitment to an  initial investment.  Compact fluorescent lighting is a great example of potential savings.  Although these lights are not suitable for every location in your home, they are great for high traffic areas and hallway lighting.  These lights last 7 to 10 times longer than traditional incandescent lightings, use less energy to operate and less heat is emitted which can reduce cooling costs.